Biomarkers with Correlation to Neuronal Damage and Disease

Value Proposition

During the Gulf War, an approximately 697,000 of military personnel were deployed. From these 697,000 individuals, approximately one third (232,000) reported symptoms of neuronal damage during and after the end of the war. This phenomenon was then called the Gulf War Illness (GWI). Additionally, there are other neurodegenerative diseases and injuries that share similarities with GWI. These include, but is not limited to Parkinson’s Disease, stroke, autism, Traumatic Brain Injury and toxin exposure (organophosphates or arsenic). While brain imaging may provide some insight into the diagnosis of these neuronal diseases, it is difficult to pinpoint a diagnosis based on this. Therefore, there is a need in the clinic for both biomarkers and diagnostic kits to diagnose GWI and other neurodegenerative disease patients. Here, Dr. Abou Donia has invented a new diagnostic kit using biomarkers found in GWI patients that also have the potential to diagnose other neuronal diseases and injuries.

Technology

In this invention, novel biomarkers not previously identified to be correlated to neuronal damage and disease have been implemented in immune-assay based diagnostic kits. This invention will save time and decrease cost of the following potential diagnosis: Gulf War Illness (GWI), Parkinson’s Disease, stroke, autism, traumatic brain injury, nervous system damage caused by exposure to organophosphates or arsenic. The kits may include at least 2 proteins selected from the group consisting of GFAP, Tau, MAP-2, MAG, CaM-KII, MBP, NFP (NFH, NFM, NFL), tubulin, a-synuclein (SNCA), and S100B protein.

Advantages

  • Multiple biomarkers and kits for a single diagnosis

  • More affordable than gene signature diagnostic kits

  • Biomarker kits can diagnose the following: Gulf War Illness (GWI), Parkinson’s Disease, stroke, autism, traumatic brain injury, nervous system damage caused by exposure to organophosphates or arsenic

Duke File (IDF) Number

T-004875

Inventor(s)

  • Abou-Donia, Mohamed

For more information please contact

College

School of Medicine (SOM)