PHODDS: PAPR Hood Optimal Decontamination Distribution System

Unmet Need

Powered air purifying respirator (PAPR) hoods are commonly used to protect users from various environmental hazards. Similar to other personal protective equipment, there has been a shortage in PAPR hoods supply during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is necessary to decontaminate the hoods in order to safely reuse them. While vaporized hydrogen peroxide has proven successful for decontaminating N95 masks, the size and shape of the PAPR hoods makes complete decontamination difficult using this strategy. There is a need for technologies that enable the complete decontamination of PAPR hoods to protect healthcare workers who need to reuse them during the pandemic.

Technology

Duke inventors have developed a device for PAPR hoods called the PAPR Hood Optimal Decontamination Distribution System (PHODDS) that enables the successful decontamination with agents such as vaporized hydrogen peroxide. The design allows for optimal distribution of the agent and is intended to be used at healthcare facilities, pharmaceutical companies, research institutions, and any other entities that use PAPR hoods as part of their PPE and have a method to force the decontamination agent through the PHODDS, such as a Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide generator with a fan. This technology has been demonstrated to successfully decontaminate multiple PAPR hoods simultaneously, and this has been verified using rigorous biological and chemical indicators.

Other Applications

This device could be useful for the military where they use various types of biological and chemical suits with hoods for their training exercises.

Advantages

  • Enables the safe reuse of PAPR hoods
  • Has been tested and confirmed to perform better than other configurations to decontaminate
  • Can decontaminate multiple hoods simultaneously
  • Could be readily adapted at most entities
20 PAPR hoods can be simultaneously decontaminated with several PHODDS devices connected together.

Duke File (IDF) Number

T-007197

Inventor(s)

  • Schwartz, Antony
  • Brown, Monte
  • Knipper, Frederick "Fred"
  • Mikati, Sarah
  • Stiegel, Matthew

For more information please contact

College

School of Medicine (SOM)